Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus! pop-up ads

Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus! are fake virus warning pop-ups that redirect Android users to bogus websites or promote fake security and optimization apps. Some Android users have been getting these fake virus warnings when visiting legitimate websites which usually means that there are problems with ad providers. However, if you keep getting Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus! and similar pop ups on pretty much every site you visit then your device could be infected with adware.

Here’s an example of the offensive pop-up ad:

Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus

Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus!

We detect that your [device] is 28.1% DAMAGED because of four harmful viruses from recent adult sites. Soon it will damage your phone’s SIM card and will corrupt your contacts, photos, data, applications, etc.

If you do not remove the virus now, it will cause severe damage to your phone. Here’s what you NEED to do (step by step);

Here’s a short list of URLs used by scammers:

gpfree0097.pws
khwduvnmgt.pw
us.vitaminsperfect.xyz
warning.google.com-viruses-from-porn-sites.sstam.com

Yours might be different, scammers change URLs quite often to avoid automated filters and website blockers.

The problem is that these days it is nigh on impossible to use the internet and stay 100% protected from everything that is lurking in the darkest recesses of the World Wide Web and waiting to do us harm. Virtually ALL of us use the internet on a daily basis. And now it is not only your desktop or laptop that is at risk: tablets and smartphones – with their round the clock connectivity are also placing you firmly in harm’s way. So no matter what device you are using to access the internet, one thing is certain and that is that you need to take your online safety seriously and protect yourself from the internet’s dangers including fake virus warnings and other intrusive ads.

If you got this “Your system is heavily damaged by Four virus!” pop-up once and you managed to close it then you are probably fine. But if you keep getting it constantly then there’s probably some app installed on your device which has to be removed. To do so, please go to the Application Manager in Settings, find your web browser and clear both cache and data. See if that gets rid of the pop-up ad. If it does you will also lose your history, bookmarks etc. but that’s the price you’ll have to pay. If the clear operation doesn’t work you may need to do a factory reset, but back up your important data first. If you have an Apple device, navigate to Settings/ tap Safari/ select Clear History, Cookies and Data. That should do the trick.

Fake Rootkit.Sirefef.Spy pop-ups on Android devices

Malicious viruses: Rootkit.Sirefef.Spy and Trojan.FakeAV-Download. A short and misleading pop-up message you may get if your Android phone or tablet is infected with adware. It will display this pop-up when you use your web browser and it doesn’t matter which one, native or Chrome for instance. Rootkit.Sirefef.Spy doesn’t even exist. It’s a made up threat because Sirefef rootkit can only infect Windows machines and it can’t really spy on you.

I got this fake pop-up when I was redirected to a bogus website with even more ridiculous URL info.nq.com.recommend-apps.fantasiticads. Of course, if you don’t know the fact that it’s no an Android malware you might be scared that your device is infected. After all, the fake pop-up claims that your SIM card may be infected and you will soon lose your contacts and other important date. Scary, isn’t it? but down’t worry. It’s just a popup message or an advert if you want. The real problem is the adware app that displays such pop-ups on your device.

The fact is that every time you download something – be it a lifestyle app, an instant messenger application, or a TV series, you could also potentially be downloading a little hidden – and not entirely pleasant – extra. The clue is in the name when it comes to Potentially Unwanted Apps and adware – that’s not the $60 billion dollar question, but what is, is what Potentially Unwanted Apps can do once they are installed on your smartphone or tablet. A PUA’s most common tactic is to display adverts and pop-ups while you browse the net or simply use your device. Some of the pop-ups may be very misleading and claim that you are infected with Rootkit.Sirefef.Spy and Trojan.FakeAV-Download.

Rootkit_Sirefef_Spy

If you got this “Malicious viruses: Rootkit.Sirefef.Spy and Trojan.FakeAV-Download” pop-up once and you managed to close it then you are probably fine. But if you keep getting it constantly then there’s probably some app installed on your device which has to be removed. To do so, please go to the Application Manager in Settings, find your web browser and clear both cache and data. See if that gets rid of the pop-up ad. If it does you will also lose your history, bookmarks etc. but that’s the price you’ll have to pay. If the clear operation doesn’t work you may need to do a factory reset, but back up your important data first.

ATTENTION! Your mobile device has been blocked up for safety reasons pop-up ads

ATTENTION! Your mobile device has been blocked up for safety reasons. AUDIO AND VIDEO RECORDING IN PROGRESS. Amount of fine is 100$. You can pay a fine with Ukash or PaySafeCard vouchers. TYPE YOUR CODE (100$ Ukash or PaySafeCard) AND PRESS ‘OK’.

If you keep getting this fake pop-up advert on your mobile device then you were either redirected to a bogus website or your device is infected with adware. Scammers use multiple websites for malwaretising to avoid detection. In my case it was kcorpdevicegovprotectverify.pw but your might be different. Scammers target users from both platforms Android and iOS, so don’t be surprised if you get this fake advert on your iPhone. Malwaretising is not just about Android devices.

kcorpdevicegovprotectverify

Adware apps are often overlooked as being the baby of the bunch when it comes to malware or online attacks, but that’s not to say you should disregard them, for, like any apps which installs itself surreptitiously on your mobile device, they have not been designed with your user experience in mind. Adware apps are software programs that are downloaded onto your smartphone or tablet, usually without your knowledge or permission. If that doesn’t make sense from the get go and you’re wondering how you could ever download something without knowing about it, let us introduce you to the sneaky way in which malware, and adware apps, work.

If you got this “ATTENTION! Your mobile device has been blocked up for safety reasons” pop-up once and you managed to close it then you are probably fine. But if you keep getting it constantly then there’s probably some app installed on your device which has to be removed. To do so, please go to the Application Manager in Settings, find your web browser and clear both cache and data. See if that gets rid of the pop-up ad. If it does you will also lose your history, bookmarks etc. but that’s the price you’ll have to pay. If the clear operation doesn’t work you may need to do a factory reset, but back up your important data first. If you have an Apple device, navigate to Settings/ tap Safari/ select Clear History, Cookies and Data. That should do the trick.

WARNING: System may not have Malware protection scam

“WARNING: System may not have Malware protection” notification is a scam. Scammers use it to scare mobile and PC users into either downloading bogus security apps or promoting scam tech support. It usually appears randomly while browsing the web. The fake warning itself isn’t malicious but you shouldn’t follow the instructions it gives you.

18886545803

WARNING: System may not have Malware protection
Your personal photos, Facebook and other personal passwords, as well as credit card information could be at risk!
For help removing Malware & Adware, call Tech support online right away: 1-888-654-5803

The phone number has already been reported by users as a scam which means scammers use it rather actively. The warning may be different for some users. In this case, it said that your computer might be infected with adware and malware that can steal your passwords and credit card details. That’s a typical tech support scam. Such phone numbers are rarely toll free and even if they were scammers use them to trick you into downloading bogus anti-virus software. Sometimes, they even install spyware in order to track your online activity.

In case you are constantly getting fake Your smart phone may have viruses from adult websites pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups (recently installed). Most likely, your device is infected with adware. Also, scan your computer with reputable antivirus app.

Is Flickr App Safe?

Flickr App safety and reputation rating is excellent. It was developed by Yahoo! Inc. There are no hidden or unnecessary permissions, functions or content that could potentially cause damage, display intrusive ads or spy your browsing habits. This app can take pictures, find your location, modify/delete SD card contents, send/receive SMS messages, read contact data and it also has a full Internet access.

Verdict: use Flickr App with confidence.

Download location: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.yahoo.mobile.client.android.flickr

Your smart phone may have viruses from adult websites pop-up ads

“Your smart phone may have viruses from adult websites” is yet another intrusive pop-up ad that tries to trick Android tablet and phone users into downloading shady apps. As far as I can tell, it targets tablet users more often than phone owners. It usually appears randomly while moving between web pages. Tapping your device is enough to trigger the ad, just like any other intrusive advertisement. Here’s the full text of the pop-up ad:

The page at cleanmaster.mobiilebatterysolution.com says:

Your smart phone may have viruses from adult websites.
If left unresolved, this will cause slow performance, faster battery draining and total system failure.
Click OK to download the latest Clean Master from Google Play Store and remove the viruses now.

The web page at mobiilebatterysolution.com also detects your device model, for instance, “Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 user:” to make it look more genuine and reliable.

Needless to say, this pop-up warning about possible viruses on your device is completely false. Simply close it and do not download any apps. Most of the time, it pushes an app called Clean Master from Google Play store. In some cases, download location might be different. One way or another, this app is pretty much useless because it won’t make you phone or table run faster, it certainly won’t extend battery life and won’t protect from system failures.

In case you are constantly getting fake Your smart phone may have viruses from adult websites pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups (recently installed). Most likely, your device is infected with adware. Also, scan your computer with reputable antivirus app.

Further useful reading: Smartphone Security – Best Practices.

Warning! Your phone has (13) Virus! pop-up ads

Warning! Your phone has (13) Virus! are misleading pop up ads that lead users to a scam virus check. Users are reporting the issue with fake warning on eBay, NHL and other popular website. Of course, it doesn’t mean that those sites are trying to install some shady apps on your phone or tablet. They are likely having problems with their ad providers and hopefully will kill the offensive ads as soon as possible. However, if you keep getting Warning! Your phone has (13) Virus! and similar pop ups on pretty much every site you visit then your phone could be infected with adware.

Here’s an example of the offensive ad:

Warning! Your phone has (13) Virus!
The Virus may corrupt your data.
Please follow the instructions to remove the Virus.

kingmoible.com pop up

Then there’s a fake system notification with the steps on how to remove the supposedly detected virus.

Step 1: DOWNLOAD and INSTALL 360 Mobile Security Antivirus App!
Step 2: Open the App and Remove ALL Viruses

Your Phone has (13) virus! warning

If you click Download Here button you will be redirected to another websites to download an antivirus app called 360 Mobile Security Antivirus. It is developed by Qihu 360 Software Co., LTD based in China, I wrote about this app in my previous post. The fake pop-ups came from kingmoible.com.

I also noticed that scammers are using different virus warnings to scare users. Here’s yet another faker virus scan page.

WARNING: YOU MAY BE AT RISK!
COMPLETE : (7) THREATS
(3) MALWARE APPS
(2) VIRUS THREATS
(1) VS. 2.3 UPDATE
(1) SECURITY UPDATE

warning you may be at risk pop up

Although the fake ads are slightly different they all redirect users to either fake sites or Google Play to download shady apps. If you got any of these pop ups, close them immediately and do not download anything. Just close it or hit back button. In case you are constantly getting fake Warning! Your phone has (13) Virus! pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups (recently installed). Most likely, your device is infected with adware. Also, scan your computer with reputable antivirus app.

Further useful reading: Smartphone Security – Best Practices.

Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake virus pop up – how to remove

Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake is a malicious app that can track your phone’s or tablet’s location and send it to a remote server or directly to a person who tries to spy on you. This Trojan horse is quite dangerous but the good news is that it was detected and removed from app markets very quickly. It’s not a very widespread threat now. However, I recently stumbled upon a few fake pop ups that were using this threat to scare users into thinking that their Android devices were infected with Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake. It’s not the first time when scammers use existing threats to trick users into installing fake or useless antivirus apps. The virus warning is fake. I got this fake pop up warning from mobile.alert.secure-intl.com:

ANDROID VIRUS DETECTED

A site you recently visited has infected your phone with (Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake).

Press OK to remove the threat.

mobile.alert.secure-intl.com virus warning

As I said, it’s fake. Your smartphone or tablet is not infected. Just close the pop up and do not download anything.

Then, I found another scam related to Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake. It was a fake virus scanner. Here’s the screenshot:

WARNING: Virus Detected!
VIRUS NAME: TAPSNAKE
Infected File: /os/apps/snake.icv
Description: Steals passwords and credit card information.
ACT NOW (HIGH RISK)

tapsnake virus warning

This security warning looks like the real thing. It mimics real antivirus scanners and it does this really well. Not too tech-savvy users can be easily tricked into installing fake antivirus app. If you got one as well, take a deep breath and don’t panic. Your device is not infected.

Once the scan is finished, the fake web page redirects users to Google Play to install an app called Armor for Android. It might be different for you. Or instead of download it from Google Play it may redirected you to androidsecurityfree.org web page which will display yet another fake virus warning.

If you got the same fake warning do not click on the pop-up box or anywhere in it. Just close it or hit back button. In case you are constantly getting fake Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups (recently installed). Most likely, your device is infected with adware. Also, scan your computer with reputable antivirus app.

Further useful reading: Smartphone Security – Best Practices.

Google-android-safe.com virus warning pop ups on Android

Beware of new misleading pop ups from http://update.google-android-safe.com that have recently started to occur on eBay. I bet similar misleading virus pop ups will occur on other websites as well but probably with slightly modified or completely different warnings. The latest pop ups say that your phone or tablet is infected with viruses. Here’s an example:

Warning:Your phone has (13) Virus!

The Virus may comput you date .

Please follow instructions to remove Virus

update.google-android-safe.com pop up

It’s nothing new really and it even has typos. The main goal of this fake virus warning is to scare you into thinking that your phone is infected with viruses. If you click OK you will be redirected to Google Play to download a security app called 360 Security. It’s a free antivirus app developed by Qihu 360 Software Co., LTD based in China. Of course, it doesn’t mean that other users will be redirected to the same product but at least for me it was the 360 Security app. The app was recently updated and even though it has many positive reviews, more than 40,000 gave it 1-2 starts rating complaining about memory usage, unethical advertising and some users even say it’s a fake app. Since it’s promoted in such a questionable way, I wouldn’t use it. Besides, there are many great apps from well known and trusted antivirus vendors.

In case you are constantly getting fake update.google-android-safe.com pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups. Most likely, your device is infected with adware that displays fake virus warning from google-android-safe.com.

Further useful reading: Smartphone Security – Best Practices.

Mobile.alert.secure-intl.com virus warning on Android

Beware, it’s a fake virus warning that attempts to scare you into thinking that your phone or tablet is infected with malware, for example Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake. Scammers didn’t made it up, such infection exists and it’s pretty nasty. It can track your location and do other malicious stuff. However, in this case, scammers are only using it to scare you. They may use other threat names in the future. The fake mobile.alert.secure-intl.com pop up virus warning says:

ANDROID VIRUS DETECTED

A site you recently visited has infected your phone with (Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake).

Press OK to remove the threat.

mobile.alert.secure-intl.com virus warning

If you click OK you will be redirected to another fake page that says “ANDROID WARNING”, then there’s an Android logo and a big button to REMOVE VIRUS.

fake android warning

Then you will be redirected to yet another page which pretends to scan your phone or tablet for virus: http://mobile.alert.secure-intl.com/detection.html. It’s not a pop up but a fake virus scanner. Just like the previous pop up it basically says the same thing – your computer is infected with Trojan:MobileOS/Tapsnake but this time in a more fancy and convincing way. The fake scanners says that Tapsnake virus scan steal your password and credit card information. Basic stuff actually, nothing really interesting or new. But, unfortunately it might work because it’s a new platform and users may not be aware of such things.

At the end, it says that you need to install an antivirus app to remove found malware from your Android device. At this point, users can be redirected to different fake antivirus apps. They usually promote more than one app. It could be Armor for Android or something different. The most important thing is to hit back button as soon as you get such fake pop-ups and do not install anything on your phone. It won’t hurt scanning your phone with reputable antivirus app from Google Play.

In case you are constantly getting fake mobilekd.com pop-ups on your phone or tablet, go to device’s Settings menu > Apps or Application manager (this may differ depending on your device). Uninstall apps that may display these pop-ups. Most likely, your device is infected with adware that displays fake virus warning from mobile.alert.secure-intl.com.

Further useful reading: Smartphone Security – Best Practices.